Additional resources for Williams syndrome

Salk Institute for Biological Studies - Additional resources for Williams syndrome

Additional resources for Williams syndrome


Central Resources for Information about Williams Syndrome

Williams Syndrome Association for Families, a great resource for understanding Williams Syndrome for Parents, Teachers, Clinicians, and Researchers

Williams syndrome shows gene behavior links: Key to autism? (2011) CBS News [ link to pdf ]

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Documentary Film Josie: A Story About Williams Syndrome, Vision Project [ link to video ]

Williams Syndrome Oliver Sacks and UB “A highly musical species” [ link to video ]

Growing Up Different, Scientific American Frontiers [ link to video ]

A Very Special Brain, 60 minutes [ link to video ]

Williams Syndrome Demo [ link to video ]

Odd Disorder of the Brain May Offer New Clues (1994). The New York Times [ Link to article ]

Lenhoff, H.M., Wang, P.P., Greenberg, F., & Bellugi, U. (1997). Williams syndrome and the brain. Scientific American. [ Link to article ]


The Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience special Supplement “Journey from Cognition to Brain to Gene”

Journal of Cognitive Neuroscienc
From Michael S. Gazzaniga, Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, to introduce the first supplement ever to the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, “We are fortunate to have the opportunity to publish a special issue of JOCN on Williams Syndrome. This is one of the few cognitive disorders that can be analyzed at many levels. From the genome into the study of language, this fascinating disease illuminates how brains and mind are related. Dr. Ursula Bellugi and her colleagues have performed a major service by organizing and orchestrating this special issue.”
~Michael S. Gazzaniga
Bellugi, U., St. George, M. (2000). Preface to the Journal Issue. In U. Bellugi Bellugi & M. St. George, M. (Eds.) Special issue: Linking Cognitive Neuroscience and Molecular Genetics: New Perspectives from Williams Syndrome Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 12(1), 1-6. Click here to read the entire prefaceI. Bellugi, U., Lichtenberger, L., Jones, W., Lai, Z., & St. George, M. (2000). The neurocognitive profile of Williams Syndrome: A complex pattern of strengths and weaknesses. In U. Bellugi & M. St. George, M. (Eds.) Special Issue: Linking Cognitive Neuroscience and Molecular Genetics: New Perspectives from Williams Syndrome Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 12(1), 7-29. (PMID: 10953231) PubMed II. Jones, W., Bellugi, U., Lai, Z., Chiles, M., Reilly, J., Lincoln, A., & Adolphs, R. (2000). Hypersociability in Williams Syndrome. In U. Bellugi.& M. St. George, M. (Eds.) Special Issue: Linking Cognitive Neuroscience and Molecular Genetics: New Perspectives from Williams Syndrome Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 12(1), 30-46. (PMID: 10953232) PubMed III. Mills, D.L., Alvarez, T.D., St. George, M., Appelbaum, L.G, Bellugi, U., & Neville, H. (2000). Electrophysiological studies of face processing in Williams Syndrome. In U. Bellugi & M. St. George, M. (Eds.) Special Issue: Linking Cognitive Neuroscience and Molecular Genetics: New Perspectives from Williams Syndrome Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, (1)12, 47-64. (PMID: 10953233) PubMed IV. Reiss, A., Eliez, S., Schmitt, J. E., Strous, E., Lai, Z., Jones, W., & Bellugi, U. (2000). Neuroanatomy of Williams Syndrome: A high-resolution MRI study. In U. Bellugi.& M. St. George, M. (Eds.) Special Issue: Linking Cognitive Neuroscience and Molecular Genetics: New Perspectives from Williams Syndrome Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 12(1), 65-73. (PMID: 10953234) PubMed V. Galaburda, A., & Bellugi, U. (2000). Multi-Level analysis of cortical neuroanatomy in Williams Syndrome. In U. Bellugi.& M. St. George, M. (Eds.) Special Issue: Linking Cognitive Neuroscience and Molecular Genetics: New Perspectives from Williams Syndrome Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 12(1), 74-88. (PMID: 10953235) PubMed VI. Korenberg, J., Chen, X-N., Hirota, H., Lai, Z., Bellugi, U., Burian, D., Roe, B., & Matsoka, R. (2000). Genome structure and cognitive map of Williams Syndrome. In U. Bellugi.& M. St. George, M. (Eds.) Special Issue: Linking Cognitive Neuroscience and Molecular Genetics: New Perspectives from Williams Syndrome Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 12(1), 89-107. (PMID: 10953236) PubMed

Selected Background Papers from PPG

***Chailangkarn, T., Hrvoj-Mihic, B., Yu, D.X., Brown, T.T., Marchetto, M.C.N., Bardy, C., & Muotri, A.R. (2016). A human neurodevelopmental model for Williams syndrome. Nature, 536, 338-343. PubMed

Lew, C., Brown, C., Bellugi, U., & Semendeferi, K. (2016). Neuron density is decreased in the prefrontal cortex in Williams syndrome. Autism Research, doi:10.1002/aur.1677. PubMed

Järvinen, A., Korenberg, J. R., & Bellugi, U. (2013). The social phenotype of Williams syndrome. Current opinion in neurobiology, 23(3):414-22. PubMed

Mills, D. L., Dai, L., Fishman, I., Yam, A., Appelbaum, L. G., St. George, M., … & Korenberg, J. R. (2013). Genetic Mapping of Brain Plasticity Across Development in Williams Syndrome: ERP Markers of Face and Language Processing. Developmental neuropsychology38(8), 613-642. PubMed

Dai, L., Carter, C. S., Ying, J., Bellugi, U., Pournajafi-Nazarloo, H., & Korenberg, J. R. (2012). Oxytocin and vasopressin are dysregulated in Williams syndrome, a genetic disorder affecting social behavior. PloS one7(6). PubMed

Fishman, I., Yam, A., Bellugi, U., Lincoln, A., & Mills, D. (2011). Contrasting patterns of language-associated brain activity in autism and Williams syndrome. Social cognitive and affective neuroscience6(5), 630-638. PubMed

Golarai, G., Hong, S., Haas, B., Galaburda, A.M., Mills, D., Bellugi, U., Grill-Spector, K., & Reiss, A.L. (2010). The fusiform face area is enlarged in Williams syndrome. Journal of Neuroscience, 30(19), 6700-12. PubMed

Haas, B.W., Hoeft, F., Searcy, Y.M., Mills, D., Bellugi, U., & Reiss, A. (2010). Individual differences in social behavior predict amygdala response to fearful facial expressions in Williams syndrome. Neuropsychologia, 48(5), 1283-8. PubMed

Zitzer-Comfort, C., Reilly, J.S., Korenberg, J.R., & Bellugi, U. (2010). We are social—Therefore we are: The interplay of mind, culture and genetics in Williams syndrome. In C.M. Worthman, P. Plotsky, D. Schechter, & C. Cumming (Eds.) Formative experiences: The interaction of caregiving, culture, and developmental psychobiology. Cambridge University Press (pp.133-163).

Dai, L., Bellugi, U., Chen, X.N., Pulst-Korenbeg, A.M., Järvinen-Pasley, A., Tirosh-Wagner, T., Eis, P.S., Graham, J., Mills, D., Searcy, Y., & Korenberg, J.R. (2009). Is it Williams syndrome? GTF2IRD1 implicated in visual-spatial construction and GTF2I in sociability revealed by high resolution arrays. American Journal of Medical Genetics, 149A(3), 302-314. PubMed

Haas, B.W., Mills, D., Yam, A., Hoeft, F., Bellugi, U., & Reiss, A. (2009). Genetic influences on sociability: Heightened amygdala reactivity and event-related responses to positive social stimuli in Williams syndrome. The Journal of Neuroscience, 29(4), 1132-9. PubMed

Järvinen-Pasley, A., Bellugi, U., Reilly, J., Mills, D.L. Galaburda, A, Reiss, A.L., & Korenberg, J.R. (2008). Defining the social phenotype in Williams syndrome: A model of linking gene, the brain, and cognition. Development and Psychopathology, 20(1), 1-35. PubMed

Gothelf, D., Searcy, Y. M., Reilly, J., Lai, P.T., Lanre-Amos, T., Mills, D., Korenberg, J., Galaburda, A., Bellugi, U., & Reiss, A. (2008). Association between cerebral shape and social use of language in Williams syndrome. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, 146A(21), 2753-2761. PubMed

Zitzer-Comfort, C., Doyle, T., Masataka, N., Korenberg, J., & Bellugi, U. (2007). Nature and Nurture: Williams syndrome across cultures. Developmental Science,  10(6), 755-62. PubMed

Reilly, J., Losh, M., Bellugi, U., Wulfeck, B. (2004). “Frog, where are you?” Narratives in children with specific language impairment, early focal brain injury, and Williams syndrome. Brain and language, 88(2):229-47. PubMed

Doyle, T.F., Bellugi, U., Korenberg, J.R. & Graham, J. (2004).  “Everybody in the world is my friend”:  Hypersociability in young children with Williams Syndrome. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, 124A(3), 263-273. PubMed

Losh, M., Bellugi, U., Reilly, J., Anderson, D. (2000). Narrative as a Social Engagement Tool: The Excessive Use of Evaluation in Narratives from Children with Williams Syndrome. Narrative Inquiry. 10(2), 265-290. Link


Press Releases

Neurodevelopmental Model of Williams Syndrome Offers Insight into Human Social Brain (2016) Salk News Link to article

Women & Science events entertain and inspire (2016) Inside Salk Link to article

Three Salk faculty honored as recipients of senior scientist chair (2015) Inside Salk Link to article

Salk Institute Founders’ Chair, Ursula Bellugi (2015) Link to article

Connecting the Dots between Genes and Human Behavior (2014). Salk News Link to article

Women & Science lecture gives glimpse of how scientists are using stem cells to model autism spectrum disorder (2014) Inside Salk Link to article

NIH Awards Salk Institute $5.5 Million Grant to Study Williams Syndrome (2011). Salk News Link to article

Language as a Window to Sociability (2010) Salk News Link to article

The Gregarious Gene? “Everybody in the world is my friend” (2009). Salk News Link to article

Beyond Nature vs Nurture: WS (2007) Link to article

Four of the Nation’s Preeminent Research Institutions Announce Stem Cell Research Alliance (2006). Salk News Link to article


Posters and Other Information

SFN Poster Symposium PPG 2007 [ Link to poster ]

What’s Normal Anyway by Karen Levine [ Link to poster ]

“WILLIAMS SYNDROME: A MODEL FOR LINKING GENES, NEURAL SYSTEMS, AND SOCIAL PHENOTYPE”
P01 NICHD033113 RENEWAL 2010
PROGRAM DIRECTOR: URSULA BELLUGI
CO-PIs: JULIE KORENBERG & TERRY SEJNOWSKI

This exciting proposal is approved for funding ($5,000,000) by NICHD, it builds on a longstanding program project on Williams syndrome to Dr. Ursula Bellugi at the Salk Institute (starting in 1995, renewed in 2000, 2005).

This 2010 renewal has five interrelated projects illuminating gene networks for social cognition, modeling the disorder using human neurons, cellular architectonics, neuroimaging, and social phenotype of Williams syndrome. The research teams are located at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, the University of Utah, and the University of California, San Diego.

This is a unique program project which has made enormous contributions to the study of Williams syndrome. Although the organization has changed over the years, it remains under strong leadership, with Bellugi and contributions from competent investigators to direct the component research projects, recognized leaders in their fields.

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