Salk Institute
Women and Science

Salk Women & Science on Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Hosted by Professor Greg Lemke and featuring a scientific presentation by:

Janelle Ayres, Ph.D.

 

Janelle Ayres

Janelle Ayres, assistant professor in the Nomis Foundation Laboratories for Immunobiology and Microbial Pathogenesis, studies the defense strategies that enable a host cell to survive and even thrive when interacting with microbes. Dr. Ayres provided some of the first evidence that tolerance is crucial for defense against infections in animals. Using fruit flies infected with lethal bacteria, she identified genes and environmental factors, such as diet, that are important in order to tolerate and, ultimately, survive infections. She also demonstrated that a single gene could influence both resistance and tolerance so that conditions that enhance tolerance against one type of infection also can influence resistance against a different pathogen. Her work will advance knowledge of these defense mechanisms and could lead to new therapeutic approaches for treating infectious and inflammatory diseases.




Elizabeth (Betsy) ReisFor more information, please contact:
Elizabeth (Betsy) Reis
Director of Donor Relations
Phone: 858 453-4100 ext. 1426
E-mail: breis@salk.edu

About Women & Science

The vision of Salk Women & Science is to create an ongoing program that will engage women in the community with leaders in biological science and technology. The program is designed to provide a dynamic and vibrant forum in which community and business leaders and Salk’s women of science have an opportunity to gather as friends, entrepreneurs and researchers to discuss the latest discoveries in science and technology while inspiring more women to embrace scientific research as a focus of personal and philanthropic interest.



Faculty

Nicola J. Allen
Assistant Professor
Molecular Neurobiology Laboratory


Janelle S. Ayres
Assistant Professor
Nomis Foundation Laboratories for Immunobiology and Microbial Pathogenesis


Ursula Bellugi
Professor and Director
Laboratory for Cognitive Neuroscience


Suzanne Bourgeois
Professor Emerita
Regulatory Biology Laboratory


Joanne Chory
Professor and Director
Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory
Howard H. and Maryam R. Newman Chair in Plant Biology


Beverly M. Emerson
Professor
Regulatory Biology Laboratory

Katherine A. Jones
Professor
Regulatory Biology Laboratory


Julie A. Law
Assistant Professor
Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory


Vicki Lundblad
Professor
Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory


Clodagh O'Shea
Associate Professor
Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory


Catherine Rivier
Professor Emerita
Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology


Tatyana Sharpee
Associate Professor
Computational Neurobiology Laboratory
Helen McLoraine Developmental Chair in Neurobiology




Elizabeth (Betsy) ReisFor more information, please contact:
Elizabeth (Betsy) Reis
Director of Donor Relations
Phone: 858 453-4100 ext. 1426
E-mail: breis@salk.edu

Future Women & Science Events

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Faculty Videos

Cold viruses point the way to new cancer therapies - Clodagh O'Shea

Adenovirus, a type of cold virus, has developed molecular tools—proteins—that allow it to hijack a cell's molecular machinery, including large cellular machines involved in growth, replication and cancer suppression. The Salk scientists identified the construction of these molecular weapons and found that they bind together into long chains (polymers) to form a three-dimensional web inside cells that traps and overpowers cellular sentries involved in growth and cancer suppression. The findings, published October 11 in Cell, suggest a new avenue for developing cancer therapies by mimicking the strategies employed by the viruses. Read more>>





Fruit fly intestine may hold secret to the fountain of youth - Leanne Jones

One of the few reliable ways to extend an organism's lifespan, be it a fruit fly or a mouse, is to restrict calorie intake. Now, a new study in fruit flies is helping to explain why such minimal diets are linked to longevity and offering clues to the effects of aging on stem cell behavior. Read more>>


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