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INSIDE SALK

SPRING 2017

WWW.SALK.EDU

In an attempt to provide a more

objective scale for research and

diagnosis, Terrence Sejnowski, first

author David Peterson and colleagues

have developed a computer program

that takes over the job, analyzing

videos of patients’ faces. The program

could eventually be expanded to help

study facial tics and twitches in other

contexts, including Tourette syndrome,

schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease.

The research was described online

on October 21, 2016, in

Neurology

,

the medical journal of the American

Academy of Neurology.

SALK SCIENTISTS ADAPT COMPUTER

PROGRAM TO GAUGE EYE SPASM

SEVERITY

A

C. elegans

roundworm

Work by Sreekanth Chalasani’s lab

suggests that, in both roundworms

and humans, adolescent brains mature

to stable adult brains by changing

which brain cells they use to generate

behavior. Teen worm brains drive

wishy-washy behavior that allows

them to stay flexible in an uncertain

world, while adult worm brains drive

efficient behavior. The discovery,

published online in

eNeuro

in January

by Chalasani, first author Laura Hale

and colleagues, provides insight into

the underlying drivers of neurological

development that could help better

understand the human brain and

disease.

WORMS HAVE

TEENAGE

AMBIVALENCE,

TOO

http://www.salk.edu/ insidesalk/0417/chalasani

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