Salk Institute
Salk News
Salk News
Several minute intermediate stage in virus-cell fusion discovered; possible window of opportunity for drug development

La Jolla, CA – To ignite a life-threatening infection in the body, a virus such as HIV invades body cells by first merging, or fusing, with the cell's outer membrane. Once inside the cell, the invading microbe's genetic material takes over, turning the 'host' cell into a factory to produce more copies of the virus, which then spill out to invade other cells in the body.

read more >>



Developing nervous system sculpted by opposing chemical messengers

La Jolla, CA – A newborn baby moves, breathes and cries in part because a network of nerves called motor neurons carry signals from the infant's brain and spinal cord to muscles throughout its body.

read more >>



The ultimate spa: embryonic body wash controls left-right development

La Jolla, CA – Humans and other animals may appear to be symmetrical on the outside, but symmetry is only skin deep. Many body organs, such as the stomach, the heart and the liver, are tipped to the right or left side. So how does the developing embryo distinguish left from right? Salk scientists have now discovered that the foundations for the basic left-right body plan are laid by a microscopic 'pump' on the outer surface of the embryo's underside that wafts chemical messengers over to the left side of the body. This sets up a chemical concentration gradient that tells stem cells how and where to develop. The remarkable findings, including movie footage of the 'pump,' are published in the May 20th edition of the journal Cell.

read more >>



Unrestrained retina too much of a good thing

La Jolla, CA – When primitive nerve cells begin forming an eye in the mouse embryo, they are programmed to build a retina. But the ability to see depends upon connecting the retina to the brain via the optic nerve. Unless these embryonic cells are given the right cue at the right time, they mistakenly form a huge eye that consists entirely of retina and lacks the optic nerve.

read more >>



Vitamin A's paradoxical role in influencing symmetry during embryonic development revealed by Salk Institute scientists

La Jolla, CA – In this week's journal Nature, scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies report that they have solved one of the 'holy grail' puzzles of developmental biology: the existence of a mechanism that insures that the exterior of our bodies is symmetrical while inner organs are arranged asymmetrically.

read more >>



Salk scientist Rusty Gage elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Awardees also include sculptor, actor and Supreme Court Chief Justice

La Jolla, CA – Fred H. "Rusty" Gage, Ph.D., whose basic research at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has advanced scientific understanding about the potential of the adult brain and nervous system to repair itself, has been elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a distinction awarded annually to top individuals in business, government, public affairs, the arts and popular culture as well as biomedical research.

read more >>



In mice, walking (and running) depends on nerve cell chatter during development

La Jolla, CA – The ability of a pair of legs to walk in a stepwise fashion with each other appears to be set up during a brief period as an embryo's spine develops, when a single neurotransmitter takes its turn to "talk" to nerve cells.

read more >>



Molecular 'zipcode' guides nerves to correct places in body

La Jolla, CA – During embryonic development, thousands of nerves must be connected to muscles as part of a communication network that allows the newborn to move, breathe and lead a normal life. The question is, how does this complicated 'telephone system' get wired up?

read more >>



"Thank you, Dr. Salk" celebration will recognize 50th anniversary of polio vaccine at the La Jolla research institute founded by Jonas Salk

La Jolla, CA – On the morning of April 12, jhundreds of Salk scientists, graduate students and staff will begin their day at the Institute by celebrating the 50th anniversary of the vaccine that has saved them – and millions of others – from becoming crippled or dying from poliomyelitis or polio.

read more >>



Altering steroid receptor genes creates fat burning muscles, resistance to weight gain, and lowered inflammation.

La Jolla, CA – The Salk Institute scientist who earlier discovered that enhancing the function of a single protein produced a mouse with an innate resistance to weight gain and the ability to run a mile without stopping, has found new evidence that this protein and a related protein play central roles in the body's complex journey to obesity and offer a new and specific metabolic approach to the treatment of obesity related disease such as Syndrome X (insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis).

read more >>



<<   < PREV   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54     55     NEXT >     >>  

Get Involved

Sign up for our email newsletter

Fill out my online form.
Contact
Salk Institute for Biological Studies
Street: 10010 N Torrey Pines Rd
City: La Jolla, CA 92037
Email: webrequest@salk.edu
Phone: 858.453.4100
Charity Navigator Rating
  • Salk Twitter
  • Salk LinkedIn
  • Salk Facebook
  • Salk Instagram
  • Salk Google+
  • Salk YouTube
  • Salk RSS Feed
© Copyright 2014 Salk Institute for Biological Studies About Scientists & Research News & Media Events Support