O'Shea Lab

People

O'Shea Lab

Clodagh O'Shea

Clodagh O'Shea
Associate Professor
oshea@salk.edu
[ CV ]

Clodagh O’Shea received her Ph.D in Immunology from London’s Imperial Cancer Research Institute. She is currently an Associate Professor in the Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

Sharmistha Acharya

Sharmistha Acharya
Research Associate
sacharya@salk.edu

Sharmistha has his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Calcutta, India. She got her first MS degree in Biochemistry from Calcutta, India and her second in Animal Sciences/Molecular Biology from University of Maryland, College Park, US. She is a versatile and dedicated Biochemist with extensive knowledge in Protein Chemistry, Molecular Biology and Cell Biology.

She started her career at the National Institute on ageing in Baltimore, MD. She joined O’shea lab at the Salk Institute as a lab manager in 2012 after working for more than 6 years at the Scripps Research Institute, California. She became interested in targeted therapy for cancer, as each of the myriads of mutations that can lead to cancer, needs to be addressed specifically in a unique way so that the real patients can be benefited directly from it. She got fascinated about how adenovirus, which encodes a very small number of proteins that could overcome all the checkpoints of the abnormal replication, can be used as powerful tool for tumor targeting and therapy. She got immensely interested in the research of the O’shea group as delineating these adenoviral targets in the cell can provide informative insight in tumorigenic potentials of the same.

Jason DeHart

Jason DeHart
Research Associate
jdehart@salk.edu

Viruses are obligate intracellular pathogens typically with minimal genomes and limited coding capacity. As such viruses have evolved to encode a minimal number of highly potent genes capable of disrupting large complex cellular signaling networks in order to commandeer the host cellular machinery for viral replication. Interestingly, many of the signaling pathways viruses take control of, such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response and apoptosis, are the same pathways targeted during tumorigenesis. As a graduate student, while working on HIV-1 which also de-regulates cell cycle progression and apoptosis, I became interested in using viruses as molecular tools to understand normal cellular signaling pathways and as guides to identify key components of these pathways which are commonly targeted by both viruses and cancers. Since joining the O'Shea lab I have been working to understand how Adenovirus is able to specifically silence p53 target genes through de novo heterochromatin formation thus inactivating a key tumor suppressor that is mutated or inactivated in nearly all cancers.

Kristen Espantman

Kristen Espantman
Graduate Student
kespantman@salk.edu

My work has revealed that viral proteins known to target PML, such as Adenovirus E4-ORF3 and Herpex Simplex Virus-1 ICP0, actually converge on a large subset of the family of Tripartite Motif Protiens, of which PML is a member. TRIM proteins are a superfamily with over 70 members in humans with a conserved tripartite motif at their N-terminus. I am now exploring the functions of TRIM proteins during viral infection to reveal if and what their anti-viral role is.

Jennifer Higginbotham

Jennifer Higginbotham
Graduate Student
jhigginbotham@ucsd.edu

Jenny Higginbotham is a graduate student in the O'Shea lab through the Biomedical Sciences Program at UCSD. She did her undergraduate studies at Xavier University in Ohio, during which she worked in the lab of Susa Wells at Cincinnati Children's Hospital. Working here piqued her interest in studying DNA viruses and cancer, and her desire to continue these studies brought her to the O'Shea lab. She is currently investigating how adenovirus induces chromatin remodeling in the cell.

Shigeki Miyake-Stoner

Shigeki Miyake-Stoner
Graduate Student
shigekims@salk.edu

Shig did his undergraduate studies at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, PA where he worked in the lab of Dr. Ryan Mehl using non-sense suppression unnatural amino acid (UAA) tools to study and utilize enzyme substrate promiscuity, and developed UAAs as FRET probes for studying protein folding and stability. He is currently a graduate student in the O'Shea lab through UCSD Biological Sciences. He is developing a new strategy for adenovirus targeting to enable controlled infection of refractory cell types, and manipulating virus genes that interact with the Rb tumor-suppressor pathway to develop selective and potent oncolytic adenoviruses.

Horng Ou

Horng Ou
Research Associate
hou@salk.edu

Form follows function or function follows form? How do 2 interacting proteins find each other in a cell within millions of other macromolecules? Since my college days at UCSD, I have always been fascinated by protein structures and how they encode functions within them. To search for these answers, I have traveled from San Francisco (US), Frankfurt (Germany), and Oxford (England), and returned back to San Diego again. This time I am attracted to viral proteins structures and seeking to understand how small viral proteins can disrupt large cellular macromolecular complexes.

William Partlo William Partlo
Research Associate
wpartlo@salk.edu

William received a B.S. in electrical engineering from University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1987 and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from UC-Berkeley in 1992 (Yes, those dates are correct!).  After spending nearly 20 years working in the semiconductor industry, he switched disciplines to biological sciences and entered the UCSD graduate program in 2012.  He is currently working on oncolytic viruses as part of the O’Shea lab synthetic biology sub-group.

Joanna San Pedro Joanna San Pedro
Research Associate
jsanpedro@salk.edu

Joanna is originally from the Philippines. She moved to the US (Baltimore, MD) to pursue her Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry at Johns Hopkins University under Professor Marc Greenberg where she studied oxidative DNA damage. After graduate school, she moved to California and joined the laboratory of Prof. O’Shea to explore a unique interface between chemistry and biology. At Salk, she will apply her knowledge of nucleic acid chemistry to help efforts in the lab in developing a novel and general photo-oxidation assay that will allow identification of the genomic interactions of large protein complexes and nuclear bodies. This technology would be very useful in understanding the nuclear architecture, for example, looking at the structure of the DNA interacting with specific proteins or allowing identification of proteins that could lead into insights into different nuclear interactions.

Govind Shah

Govind Shah
Graduate Student
gshah@salk.edu

I am a graduate student in the O’Shea lab. I earned my bachelor’s in molecular, cell, and developmental biology at UCLA, where I worked in the laboratory of Steve Jacobsen.

My project focuses on determining why adenoviral proteins inactivate the p53 transcription factor and the DNA damage response network—two important (and well studied) tumor suppressor pathways. I hope to elucidate the antiviral features of these tumor suppressor pathways and bring us closer to understanding why DNA viruses converge on inactivating them. Given that homologs of p53 and multiple DNA damage response proteins are conserved throughout metazoans, it is interesting to speculate that antiviral properties may be some of their most ancient functions.

When I’m not all up in TC, I like to draw. Check out my work at this website.

Lorane Texari

Lorane Texari
Research Associate
ltexari@salk.edu

Text coming soon.

Gavin Jingwen Yin

Gavin Jingwen Yin
Research Associate
jyin@salk.edu

I earned my B.S. in Bio-pharmaceutical engineering at Jilin University from China, then I moved on to earn my Ph.D. at Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology (the first synthesized peptide with activity, bovine insulin, was born there). There, I joined Gang Wang’s lab and worked on the function of Mediator Complex in cell fate determination and found an interesting balance role of MED23 subunit in regulating adipocyte and smooth muscle cell differentiation. I joined the O’Shea lab in March 2014. My current project is utilizing CRISPER and EM tech to target and detect the structure of a specific genomic locus with a much higher resolution than ever (nm level). If that works, it will be really exciting to observe the structure changes correlated to biological events, such as gene activation/repression, cancer gene transformation, virus infection et al.

 

O'Shea Lab Alumni

Carine Bossard
Scientist
Samumed

Aaron Yun Chen
Scientist
Pathway Genomics

Fanny Estermann
Research Associate
CRLC Val d'Aurelle

Colin Powers
Scientist
Biomatrica

Conrado Soria
Comprehensive Biospecimen Resource Coordinator
(in support of NCI, caHUB)

 

© 2012 Salk Institute for Biological Studies
10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 | 858.453.4100 | webmaster@salk.edu