O'Shea Lab

People

O'Shea Lab

Clodagh O'Shea

Clodagh O'Shea
Associate Professor
oshea@salk.edu

Dr. O’Shea earned her bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry from University College Cork, Ireland. She did her doctorate in Immunology at the I.C.R.F. and Imperial College London, revealing key signals that regulate the development of our immune systems. After her graduate studies, she was selected for a Raleigh International expedition to Namibia where she worked on environmental, conservation and development projects. She did her postdoctoral research in Dr. Frank McCormick’s lab at UCSF on the prototype for oncolytic viral cancer therapy, ONYX-015. She has received numerous awards for her research (see Awards tab). In her spare time, she is an avid outdoors enthusiast who loves to climb and explore the world’s most adventurous and exotic destinations.

Sharmistha Acharya

Sharmistha Acharya
Research Associate
sacharya@salk.edu

Sharmistha has her BS degree in Chemistry and MS degree in Biochemistry from the University of Calcutta and a second MS in Animal Sciences/Molecular Biology from the University of Maryland. She is a Biochemist by training with extensive knowledge in Protein Chemistry, Molecular Biology and Cell Biology. She joined the O’Shea Lab as a lab manager in 2012 after working for 6 years at The Scripps Research Institute and 2 years at NIA in Baltimore, MD.

She became interested in targeted therapy for cancer by using adenovirus as a tool, as each of the myriads of mutations that can lead to cancer needs to be addressed specifically in a unique way so that the real patients can be benefited directly from it.

Irene Chen Irene Chen
ichen@salk.edu

Irene is a undergraduate at UCSD, majoring in Biochemistry and Cell Biology and minoring in Computer Science. Previously, she had worked in the lab of Dr. Shu-ou Shan at CalTech. She is currently working on elucidating the structure and function of an adenovirus protein.

Jason DeHart

Jason DeHart
Research Associate
jdehart@salk.edu

Viruses are obligate intracellular pathogens typically with minimal genomes and limited coding capacity. As such, viruses have evolved to encode a minimal number of highly potent genes capable of disrupting large complex cellular signaling networks in order to commandeer the host cellular machinery. Since joining the O'Shea lab, I have been using DNA viruses to interrogate critical pathways targeted by both viruses and cancer in order to elucidate potentially key druggable targets.

Jennifer Higginbotham

Jennifer Higginbotham
Graduate Student
jhigginbotham@ucsd.edu

Jenny Higginbotham is a graduate student in the O'Shea lab through the Biomedical Sciences Program at UCSD. She did her undergraduate studies at Xavier University in Ohio, during which she worked in the lab of Susa Wells at Cincinnati Children's Hospital. Working here piqued her interest in studying DNA viruses and cancer, and her desire to continue these studies brought her to the O'Shea lab. She is currently investigating how adenovirus induces chromatin remodeling in the cell.

Shigeki Miyake-Stoner

Shigeki Miyake-Stoner
Graduate Student
shigekims@salk.edu

Shig did his undergraduate studies at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, PA where he worked in the lab of Dr. Ryan Mehl using non-sense suppression unnatural amino acid (UAA) tools to study and utilize enzyme substrate promiscuity, and developed UAAs as FRET probes for studying protein folding and stability. He is currently a graduate student in the O'Shea lab through UCSD Biological Sciences. He is developing a new strategy for adenovirus targeting to enable controlled infection of refractory cell types, and manipulating virus genes that interact with the Rb tumor-suppressor pathway to develop selective and potent oncolytic adenoviruses.

Horng Ou

Horng Ou
Research Associate
hou@salk.edu

Form follows function or function follows form? How do 2 interacting proteins find each other in a cell within millions of other macromolecules? Since my college days at UCSD, I have always been fascinated by protein structures and how they encode functions within them. To search for these answers, I have traveled from San Francisco (US), Frankfurt (Germany), and Oxford (England), and returned back to San Diego again. This time I am attracted to viral proteins structures and seeking to understand how small viral proteins can disrupt large cellular macromolecular complexes.

William Parlo William Partlo
Research Associate
wpartlo@salk.edu

William received a B.S. in electrical engineering from University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1987 and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from UC-Berkeley in 1992 (Yes, those dates are correct!).  After spending nearly 20 years working in the semiconductor industry, he switched disciplines to biological sciences and entered the UCSD graduate program in 2012.  He is currently working on oncolytic viruses as part of the O’Shea lab synthetic biology sub-group.

Joanna San Pedro Joanna San Pedro
Research Associate
jsanpedro@salk.edu

Joanna is from the Philippines, moved to Baltimore, MD (Johns Hopkins) to pursue her Ph.D. in Chemistry (oxidative DNA damage) and is now in California, where she is exploring a unique interface between chemistry and biology at the O’Shea lab. She is applying her knowledge of nucleic acid chemistry in developing new chemical tags that will allow identification of 3D local interactions of any protein complex or genomic locus in situ. This will allow researchers to see the nuclear architecture in greater detail than before.

Govind Shah

Govind Shah
Graduate Student
gshah@salk.edu

I study the anti-viral role of the DNA damage response pathway. We have discovered that the same proteins that sense cellular DNA breaks also sense and block Adenovirus DNA replication. However, the sensing of small viral genomes is saturable and triggers a localized signaling response—one uncoupled to the response to host DNA breaks. Our work has important implications for developing novel oncolytic therapies that take advantage of genomic instability in cancer cells.

Lorane Texari

Lorane Texari
Research Associate
ltexari@salk.edu

I did my Ph.D. in Switzerland and worked at understanding the role of the nuclear pore in gene expression in S. cerevisiae. I am currently interested in understanding the role of nuclear architecture and more specifically chromosome organization in nuclear functions such as transcription in a cancer related context. The laboratory identified a new protein able to downregulate p53 target genes in an H3K9me3 dependent manner but independently of p53 inactivation. This protein is an adenoviral protein named E4-ORF3 that forms a remarkable nuclear polymer. An outstanding question is how E4-ORF3 specifies repressive heterochromatin assembly at p53 target genes. My work is to investigate how E4-ORF3 recognizes specific loci and changes chromatin architecture and how this mechanism changes gene expression.

Gavin Jingwen Yin

Gavin Jingwen Yin
Research Associate
jyin@salk.edu

I joined the O’Shea lab in March 2014. My current project is utilizing CRISPER and EM tech to target and detect the structure of a specific genomic locus with a much higher resolution than ever (nm level). It will be really exciting to observe the structure changes correlated to biological events, such as gene activation/repression, cancer gene transformation, virus infection, et al.

Lei Zhang Lei Zhang
Research Associate
lezhang@salk.edu

I come from China and am now a postdoc in the O’Shea lab. During my Ph.D. period at the Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, I studied the epigenetic modification in the reprogramming and tumorigenesis process. Now my interests include the regulation of adenovirus transcription, the application of adenovirus on wound repair and marking the tissue stem cell in vivo. In my spare time, I like several ball games and meditation.

 

 

 

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