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MIT and Stanford Scientists join Salk Institute's Non-Resident Fellows

Nonresident Fellows

Dr. Irving L. Weissman and
Dr. Eric S. Lander

Two highly accomplished researchers from the stem cell and genomics fields are the newest members of Salk's Non-Resident Fellows, a distinguished group of scientists that help benchmark and guide Salk faculty and scientific programs.

Eric S. Lander, founding director of The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and Irving L. Weissman, M.D., director of the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, joined the Salk faculty in November.

Recently named by President Barack Obama to co-chair the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, Dr. Lander and his team have developed many of the key tools and information resources of modern mammalian genomics, and have applied these tools and data to pioneer novel approaches to understand the molecular basis of disease.

Dr. Weissman directs Stanford's National Cancer Institute-designated Cancer Center, and is the Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor for Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research. In 1988, he became the first to isolate stem cells of any kind when he isolated hematopoietic or blood-forming stem cells from mice. He subsequently isolated human hematopoietic stem cells, human neuronal stem cells, and human leukemia stem cells. His work has opened up MIT and Stanford Scientists join Salk Institute's Non-Resident Fellows New Faces 26 Inside Salk April 2010 www.salk.edu Dr. Irving L. Weissman Dr. Eric S. Lander an entirely new area of scientific research with enormous potential for life-saving therapies.

"The Salk faculty and I are pleased and honored to welcome Drs. Weissman and Lander as our newest Non-Resident Fellows," said Institute President William R. Brody. "The Salk Institute's faculty relies on outstanding research leaders like these to help keep our research on the leading edge of science."